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Oscar Wilde Exhibition

Posted on February 28, 2017 @12:35 pm by kferrante

Wilde-exhibitionA new exhibition is on display this month at Rare Books at Special Collections, featuring rare publications of works by Oscar Wilde:

“That mighty love which maddens one to crime,” Teleny, Oscar Wilde, and Decadent Publishing in the 1890s

This exhibition will be on display until January 31, 2014, and is free and open to the public Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, contact Rare Books and Special Collections at 604-822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

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RBSC holiday hours

Posted on February 28, 2017 @2:44 pm by cshriver

Sequoia tree with Christmas lights in front of old Main Library, UBC

Sequoia tree with Christmas lights in front of old Main Library

Happy holidays from the RBSC family to yours!

Just a reminder that Rare Books and Special Collections will be closing for the holidays at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, December 24, and will remain closed from December 25 through January 1. We will reopen at 10 a.m. on Friday, January 2. Please note that Saturday hours for the spring term do not start until January 31. More information about RBSC’s hours can be found on the UBC Library website.

We hope to see you in the New Year!

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Relive the fun…and the food!

Posted on December 9, 2014 @11:04 am by cshriver

If you weren’t able to join us for Robert Sung’s funny and fascinating talk on December 19 entitled “Food in Transit,” you’re in luck! Thanks to the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, the talk is now available to watch online:

EmpressAsia-1922

1922 menu from the CPR’s Empress of Asia

http://www.ikebarberlearningcentre.ubc.ca/food-in-transit-by-robert-sung/

Sung’s entertaining and educational talk included personal stories of immigration, cultural and culinary exchange, and Vancouver’s local food history.

A fourth-generation Canadian, Robert Sung has a passion for culinary arts and history. For over twenty-five years, Sung’s personal and business life have revolved around the food and hospitality industry. As the owner and founder of Robert Sung Tour, Sung provides culinary walking adventures through Vancouver’s Chinatown. He is co-president of the Chinese Canadian Historical Society of British Columbia, a member of the Vancouver Chinatown Revitalization Committee, and serves as an advisor to the Asian Heritage Month Society. Sung is also a contributor to the book Eating Stories: A Chinese Canadian and Aboriginal Potluck, a collection of stories about family gatherings, home cooking, and restaurant outings.

And be sure to visit the exhibition that inspired the talk: “Bon Voyage / Bon Appétit: Menus from the Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s Ships, Trains, Planes, and Hotels.” Whether you prefer quick eats or fine dining, you’re sure to enjoy this display of eye-catching and mouth-watering Canadian Pacific Railway Company menus dating from the 1890s through the 1980s from the renowned Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection. The exhibition, which will be on display through December 24, 2014, is free and open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Chung Collection exhibition in Rare Books and Special Collections, level one, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

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New exhibition : Dorothy Burnett Book Binding Tools

Posted on February 28, 2017 @12:35 pm by kferrante

Dorothy_Burnett_exhibition-1

A new exhibition is now on display at Rare Books & Special Collections. This exhibition features book binding tools used by one of the first book binders in Vancouver, Dorothy Alcorn Burnett. Dorothy graduated from the Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts (now Emily Carr University) in 1930. She left her tools, plus a number of books that she made, to the library and we are excited to be able to share this collection, giving a unique glimpse into the fine art of making books.

The exhibition will be on display until April 2015 in the reading room at Rare Books & Special Collections. It is free and open to the public, and can be viewed 10am-4pm Monday through Friday, and 12pm-5pm on Saturdays.

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WWI Centennial | A Soldier’s Story

Posted on February 28, 2017 @2:45 pm by kferrante

Jack Stickney in London, 1915. Jack Stickney fonds, file 1-15, photo 28.

Jack Stickney in London, 1915. Folder 1-15, photo 28.

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the start of WWI. Here at Rare Books & Special Collections (RBSC), we have a number of items and collections related to the war, and thought we would observe the war’s centennial by highlighting a few for you in a series of blog posts.

RBSC holds the papers of many WWI soldiers, offering glimpses into the experience of those who were on the front, as well as their loved ones back home. Among these are the papers of Jack Stickney, one of the first Canadians sent overseas to fight in the war. This fonds contains material from Jack’s life leading up to the war – when he moved from the United States to Canada – through his time overseas, as well as correspondence and other documents produced after his death. Jack died in action in December 1915.

Much of the material is personal in nature. Reading these original letters, looking through his wartime diary, holding his dog tags and the telegram sent to his mother informing her of the death of her son – these all provide insights into the war experience that you can’t get from a history book.

Here are a few highlights from the collection.

A letter to Jack’s sister, dated April 28, 1915, written while he was in a trench (left), and a typed copy of this letter made later by Jack’s family (right). Click on the image to open up a full size version that you can read:

Letter to Jack's sister. Folder 1-12.

Folder 1-12

Letter to Jack's sister, typed. Folder 1-12.

Folder 1-12

The telegram sent to Jack’s mother, informing her that her son had been killed:

Telegram to Jack's mother. Folder 1-08.

Telegram to Jack’s mother. Folder 1-08.

Telegram to Jack's mother. Folder 1-08.

Telegram envelope. Folder 1-08.

If you would like to get to know this soldier a little better, visit RBSC and take a look through his papers for yourself. A full inventory of the Jack Stickney fonds is available online at http://rbscarchives.library.ubc.ca/index.php/jack-stickney-fonds.

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Bon Voyage / Bon Appétit

Posted on May 5, 2014 @10:59 am by cshriver

Empress of Russia menu

“Menu from the Empress of Russia,” 1930 from the Chung Collection CC-TX-225-56-7

Whether you prefer quick eats or fine dining, you’re sure to enjoy Bon Voyage / Bon Appétit: Menus from the Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s Ships, Trains, Planes, and Hotels, RBSC’s new exhibition of eye-catching and mouth-watering Canadian Pacific Railway Company menus dating from the 1890s through the 1980s from the renowned Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection.

The exhibition, which will be on display until the end of December 2014, is free and open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Chung Collection exhibition in Rare Books and Special Collections, level one, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

Read more about the exhibition and its guest curator, historian Larry Wong, here!

Chateau Lake Louise menu

“Lunch menu from Chateau Lake Louise,” 1929 from the Chung Collection CC-TX-197-10-1

 

 

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Art of the Book open house!

Posted on February 28, 2017 @2:47 pm by cshriver

Art of the Book 2013

Destructors 2. Photo credit: Mike Scullen.

This Thursday, May 8, at 5:30 p.m., please join RBSC for an open house that offers a chance to view the delightful and surprising Art of the Book 2013 exhibition and to hear local book artists and members of Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild (CBBAG) discuss the works featured in the exhibition.

The open house will take place at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections, 1961 East Mall, in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 1. Read more about the Art of the Book 2013 exhibition here!

 

 

 

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Exhibition of works by Roy K. Kiyooka

Posted on February 28, 2017 @2:47 pm by sromkey

Resistant to mainstream ideas of national identity, artistic success, and artistic conventions, Roy K. Kiyooka’s flexible, unconventional use of language in his poetry voices his Japanese-Canadian ‘inglish’ and questions his Canadian identity in light of the internment faced by Japanese-Canadian citizens during World War II. Kiyooka’s poetry has been anthologized in Canadian poetry collections and in the posthumously published Pacific Windows, edited by Roy Miki. In 1987, his Pear Tree Pomes was short listed for the Governor General’s Literary Award. However, despite his national recognition, Kiyooka remains relatively unknown outside academic and literary communities. In recognition of the twentieth anniversary of his passing, the students of ASTU 400M are showcasing original print chapbooks of Kiyooka’s work and archival material to commemorate his enduring influence and unforgettable contribution to Vancouver’s (and Canada’s) artistic scene.

Hosted at Rare Books & Special on floor 1 of Irving K. Barber Learning Commons, the exhibition runs March 17-31, 2014 and is accessible 10am-4pm Monday through Friday and 12pm-5pm Saturdays.

Roy K. Kiyooka exhibition

Roy K. Kiyooka exhibition

Roy K. Kiyooka exhibition

Roy K. Kiyooka exhibition

 

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New in the Archives : 28 Years of Charles van Sandwyk’s work

Posted on February 28, 2017 @2:48 pm by kferrante

We recently had the pleasure of adding a new group of unique and beautiful items to our collection of Charles van Sandwyk material. For those of you not familiar with his delightful body of work, Charles is a local artist, illustrator and author whose published books we have been collecting for many years. Each of these books is quite a treat. They are all designed, written and illustrated by Charles, who also oversees every step of their publication.

Life is Art broadside, 1997

Life is Art broadside, 1997. Signed.

Charles’ books are difficult to categorize – on first glance they appear to be meant for children, yet there is something about the imaginative world that Charles creates within them that equally, if not even more so, captures the attention of adults.

This latest accrual adds an exciting new layer to our Charles van Sandwyk collection by offering a glimpse behind the scenes of Charles’ work and showing his development as an artist since the age of 18.  It contains over 50 items – many one-of-a-kind – including printing proofs for his books, posters for exhibits of his work, original artwork, book prospectuses, broadsides, photographs, and banners he created for the village of Deep Cove, where he resides for much of the year.  This collection will be valuable to anyone interested in learning more about Charles’ work, about the Vancouver book publishing and art world, or about independent fine art and letterpress printing.

Parade to Paradise, original artwork, 1992

Parade to Paradise, original artwork, 1992. Signed and annotated by Charles, with notes about printing.

A full description of the items is available here.

The items were brought together by the Joyce Williams Gallery, with the assistance of Charles, in the hopes of creating a body of work that would illustrate Charles’ progression over the years.  It begins with material from his first exhibit in 1984 – including a drawing, a postcard invitation, and photographs of the young Charles – and progresses through 2012, with press proofs from his book I Believe: Two Poems & a Hidden Thought and a delightful hand drawn map of the small Fijian Island of Tavewa, where Charles spends his winters.

We are excited to be preserving this important piece of our local art and publishing history and hope that you will have a chance to come in and enjoy it for yourself!

 

 

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Scanned, sealed (pun intended), and delivered

Posted on February 28, 2017 @2:49 pm by cshriver

Charles Spring

Charles Spring

Last summer, we processed a very interesting new fonds here at RBSC. The Charles E. Spring (1859-1938) fonds provides great insight into the sealing industry of British Columbia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as the on-going campaign of one man to receive restitution for the loss of his business. The son of a pioneering sealer and trader in British Columbia, Spring was educated in Victoria and worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company before taking over the family sealing business at the age of 24 upon the death of his father. Spring’s business suffered when, in 1885, United States cutters began seizing vessels caught sealing in the North Pacific in order to protect their sealing interests in Alaska. Later, in order to ease tensions between the United States and Great Britain over the Bering Sea controversy, a temporary agreement (the “Modus Vivendi”) prohibiting pelagic sealing in the Bering Sea was put in place for the 1891-1892 and 1892-1893 seasons. The resulting loss of revenue financially ruined Spring. Although Spring received a settlement for financial losses caused by the seizure of one of his ships and the “Modus Vivendi” during the 1891-1892 season, he continued to pursue claims for losses suffered due to the extension of the “Modus Vivendi” during the 1892-1893 season. He also became an active spokesman for other sealers in their claims.

Coasting license for the S.S. Mist

Coasting license for the S.S. Mist

The Charles E. Spring fonds contains records spanning the period 1888-1937 relating to the sealing industry and Spring’s claims for financial losses. A number of items from the Charles E. Spring fonds have been digitized and are now available through the Adam Matthew research database “China, America and the Pacific: Trade and Cultural Exchange”. The database is available to UBC students and faculty with a campus-wide login, or to the larger community by visiting a UBC Library and logging on to a UBC networked computer. Database users will be able to view high-resolution scans of a number of items from the Charles E. Spring fonds, including the ledgers of several schooners, crew agreements, petitions, memoranda and memorials, correspondence, court papers, log books, photographs, and more. We’re so happy to be able to share these materials and this fascinating look into B.C.’s sealing industry with all of you.

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